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Tag: News Release
  1. Sunset over Queens, New York.

    New research will look at heat wave risks during pandemic

    As the United States nears its hottest time of the year, scientists are launching a research project into whether the public health impacts of extreme heat will be amplified by the COVID-19 pandemic.

    • Weather

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  2. New ‘Sun clock’ reveals that solar activity turns off and on with surprising precision

    Solar scientists have taken a mathematical technique used by Earth scientists to analyze cyclic phenomena, such as the ebb and flow of ocean tides, and applied it to the confounding irregularity of cycles on the Sun. The result is an elegant “Sun clock” that shows that solar activity starts and stops on a much more precise schedule than could be discerned when looking at observations of the Sun in the traditional way – plotted linearly over time.

    • Sun + Space Weather

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  3. A graphic showing how COSMIC satellites measure the bend of GPS signals.

    After 14 years, first COSMIC satellite mission comes to an end

    The last of six tiny satellites that were rocketed into space 14 years ago – and then went on to prove that the wealth of accurate atmospheric data that can be gleaned from existing GPS signals can improve operational weather forecasts – was officially decommissioned on May 1, outliving its original planned lifespan by a dozen years.

    • Data,
    • Weather

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  4. Satellite image of Hurricane Michael in 2018

    Individualists are less likely to obey hurricane evacuation orders

    Residents with individualist world views are less likely to be persuaded by official predictions of risks or evacuate from an approaching hurricane, new research finds.

    • Weather

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  5. A composite image of blooming phytoplankton and swirling currents along the coast of California and western Mexico. (Credit: Norman Kuring / NASA)

    Ocean acidification prediction now possible years in advance

    A team of researchers has developed a method that could enable scientists to accurately forecast ocean acidity up to five years in advance. This would enable fisheries and communities that depend on seafood negatively affected by ocean acidification to adapt to changing conditions in real time, improving economic and food security in the next few decades. 

    • Climate

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