1. Frost on a window

    Tweets show how we normalize a changing climate

    Scientists analyzed more than 2 billion tweets to reveal how perceptions of hot and cold temperatures change over time.

    • Climate,
    • Weather

    Read Article

  2. A stark line between rain forest and agricultural land in Brazil

    Global forests soaking up carbon at quickening rate

    The world's forests are taking up increasingly more carbon, partially offsetting the carbon being released by the burning of fossil fuels and by deforestation in the tropics, according to a new synthesis of model simulations.

    • Climate

    Read Article

  3. NOAA and NCAR partner on new, state-of-the-art U.S. modeling framework

    NOAA and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have joined forces to help the nation’s weather and climate modeling scientists achieve mutual benefits through more strategic collaboration, shared resources and information.

    • Climate,
    • Weather

    Read Article

  4. Satellite image of nor'easter

    Major northeastern snowstorms expected to continue with climate change

    Climate change is expected to lessen total U.S. snowfall, but it's unlikely to rein in the most powerful nor'easters that pummel the East Coast.

    • Climate,
    • Weather

    Read Article

  5. Cover crops left over winter in a field stick up above the snow.

    Cover crops may increase winter temperatures in North America

    Cover crops grown in fields during winter may be warming temperatures in the northern United States and southern Canada, according to a new study by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The crops, a land management strategy farmers use between growing seasons, create a darker surface than a snow-covered field, absorbing more heat from the Sun and producing a local warming effect.

    • Climate

    Read Article